About your Search

20130416
20130424
STATION
CSPAN 13
CNBC 10
CSPAN2 5
FBC 4
KGO (ABC) 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 2
KTVU (FOX) 2
CNNW 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
MSNBCW 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 49
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)
in what we think is going to be an okay earnings environment, but a challenging revenue environment. not every balance sheet is going to execute equally in this environment. you've got some opportunities for -- >> what it means is the fed is going to stay the course on quantitative easing, basically. >> i think that is very clear. >> greg, tell us about this new study you're out with today. >> we found three in four americans say they are not more inclined to invest in the stock market now given the fact that interest rates are at record lows and the stock market's recently hit highs. that's the same as we found a year ago. now, a year ago, you know, in the past year interest rates have come down further. the market's gone up more. yet people are not swaying. >> what's their big fear? that they've missed it already? they're afraid it's too high? they're going to pick moment? is there too many risk? what's the big fear? >> some of each. quite frankly the memories of 2008 are very fresh. a lot of people, 2008 wasn't the first time they'd been burned. they got burned in the tech bust.
the chief of production goals from unconventional shell plays, i think the environment going forward has never looked brighter for u.s. infrastructure. >> i think et was yesterday someone said nat gas is the new safe haven, suddenly this is start to go look a little more price afforded. any view on that? >> i think that dmodty prices, a broader view, i think that peak energy, we believe in just the opposite at yorkville. we think energy prices will probably be the growth driver of the global economy. it has a lot of implications. it's very good for the u.s. and our consumers. it's very good for china. >> you say peak energy in terms of we're going to see declines -- >> i think we're going to see stability. the new energy supplies coming online are more expensive to extract from the ground, so you're not going to get back to $20 a barrel oil in our lifetime. but this $80 to $11 is 00, peaking at $120 dropping to $60 is probably a new range in the u.s. i see natural gas, it's at 350 right now, roughly, $4 to $6 range, $16 in japan, mid teen prices in germany. that's giving us a competitive
are in a no growth environment. they are getting in the way of growth. the news in europe is extremely bad and going to get worse. their economy looks just absolutely horrible. stuart: they give very much, indeed. a very clean cut opinion. we appreciate that. thank you very much. the opening bell coming up 20 seconds from now. maybe a gain of ten-15 points. please remember we were down 138 points yesterday. 352,000 new claims for unemployment insurance. that was last week. that is a relative high number. nothing like what you expected. firing trend, the layoff trend still very much with us. we opened 11 points higher. now, we are up 23. let's get right to it. apple. where did it open today? nicole petallides. nicole: at least they have an up arrow today. we have to keep a close eye on apple. people who own apple not only is they are hot on technology, but if they are on the s&p 500. stuart: down 25% so far this year. down about 50% from september, october of last year. we get the earnings next week. a big buildup for that. tuesday of next week, i believe. the opening quote for apple had a fault righ
different country, we are living in a very different environment where it is no longer patriotism and love and family, it is not terrorists and hate. we have toounderstand that. we have to say we are in fact committed to our liberties and freedom, but you know, the people also deserve to be safe in their neighborhoods and homes. melissa: you think we have to figure out what to do from here, how to live differently, what should have been the indifferently for something like this not happen? >> we have many students in boston. they get here on a student visa from countries all across the world and we are happy about that but once they get here they don't return. many of them don't return and they stay here for 6 years, they marry and become permanent citizens and we don't know if these two young men from chechnya, i know what that places like. i have seen violence in belfast and all these places where i have been, as a diplomat and an ambassador. the other thing is i always -- at the marathon and walking up the street and saw hundreds and hundreds of young people walking around with backpack
police department in the world, something i'm very proud of. but it's a complex environment. 8.4 million people. we wanted to know more about the neighborhoods that we were policing. that's the report that we did. the so-called demographics unit since change theed name, but that's what you're reporting about. it was never put in place to generate leads. it was put in place for us to have contextual information. people will say you have people not generating leads. but we generate leads in other ways, but not from that particular unit. >> how important is it it to have the cooperation of the muslim community? because one thing i'm struck by, it is citizens who report things. so the time square bomber, the police was a block away but it was a local vender who tips you off. in this case, it it appears that this guy who got his legs blown off said i want to tell you something. i saw this guy dropping a bag off. so is it important to have a cooperative relationship between a police department and these communities that you're looking at? >> sure. and we have a strong working relationship with
anywhere here in oakland, even in a beautiful neighborhood like rock ridge. it's a target rich environment. >> reporter: in this case, the shooter took off without stealing anything, leaving one man hospitalized and the neighborhood rattled. >> the coast guard boat returned to the home port in alameda today after a month- long mission. she performed two rescues along the way, the first involving two people about 90 miles off of san diego in a sinking boat. the other was just two days ago when there was a cap sized boat off of san diego county. they seized more than 2400 pounds of marijuana. there's no word on when she will shove on her next deployment. >> a really nice day across the entire bay area. lots of sunshine as temperatures are back up into the 70s and 80s. even san francisco maxed out in the 70s this afternoon. right now on live storm tracker 2, you can pick out the radar and satellite loop. you will notice the clouds heading up to the north. but the bay area is in the clear right now. we are expecting clear skies for the overnight hours. as far as current temperatures updated fo
and it's particularly challenging in this fiscal environment. the administration's $39 billion budget deficit request makes some very tough choices. it cuts the department's budget by roughly 2%, below 2012 levels. but it's the least consistent with what the congress appropriated in 2013 for the epartment. stepping back and thinking of all the challenges that our country and this department have faced since 2009, christmas day bomber, time square bomber, yemen cargo bomb plot, hurricane sandy and the ever-changing and ever-growing cyberthreat, and now the boston attack, it's easy to become concerned with this budget request. that said, we're facing extremely difficult budgetary times and sacrifices must be made. and while i recognize important missions may not receive all of the funds they or we would want in a perfect world, all departments and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required to iranian in our deficit -- rein in our deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. identifying some $1.3 billion in cost savings this year and m
our green is universal with green beer. we mean beer production that goes easy on the environment. it's an interesting story and iex breaking right here squawk this morning. miller coor's is reporting that its famous golden colorado brewery, the largest single site brewery on the planet is now weeks away from becoming a zero waste site. what does that moon exactly? more than 99% of brewery waste, glass, plastic, even spent grain gets reused or recycled. interesting story behind this initiative, the idea came from a long time employee, a shop floor technician there with the initial plan to get the company's major breweries to zero waste. for much more on earth week and this story and others, check out green.cnbc.com. kind of an interesting feel good -- and it has to do with beer and drinking. >> i didn't know this. jane wells and tom rotuna on the on assignment desk are doing this whole thing called brew and chew. >> i read about this, too. it's going the be online. >> on cnbc.com. it's all about beer news, food news. jane wells, i saw her in california two weeks ago. she said she prom
. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] (male announcer) live from the bay area here is your kron 4 news >> tub stories we're following in the kron4 morning news is suspicious package as one found near the lotta's fountain ready for a celebration. >> a big rig collision earlier this morning cause and a major back up for it the commute, but george has an update on the hot spot of 580. >> thousands of commuters are expecaffected by this problem. it is not completely clear from the traffic lanes but the resulting back up has reached all the way to the 2 05 interchange. that is still jammed. drive times as the clock that over 2 hours. it is not going to clear up any time soon. even with all the lanes open this will take a long time to clear. when the traffic is backed up like this, it has an accordion affect. it will start to move and then back again in the westbound direction. it just takes a long long time to clear. sadly, this is not our only hot spot. major delays of the bayshore freeway and then out a stamp francisco between s f o and downtown san f
that the environment worldwide is just too hard to deliver the dough. jimmy in california. jimmy! >> boo-yah, cramer, how are you? >> real good, partner. how are you? >> caller: real good, thanks. in light of the tragedies in texas, with the pullback in fertilizer stocks and the biggest corn crop since '36, what do you think about rnf with a 9% dividend or are you still sticking with seeya? >> we bought thought that was a really good idea. it's funny it hit your radar screen and my radar screen. i think that rentech is a good, good idea. it's just funny, because i was thinking about doing that on the show next week. let's go to chris in california, chris? >> caller: hey, jim, i love your show. i have a question regarding ebay. the earnings were yesterday. is this a overreaction and where do we go from here? >> i thought it was an overreaction, but there'll probably be a second day of overreaction, because people were so stunned that they actually talked about a bit of a slowdown in europe. i think the important takeaway is they reiterated and reaffirmed their growth, which is amazing. i want to buy
on environment quality are on site, they are monitoring and they are ensuring that the public is safe and that's all they would say. >> is this a plant that's had safety problems or regulatory problems in the past? >> we do know from comments made by the suspect of education that a couple of months ago in february possibly the plant did a controlled burn of some lumber and trees that were on site and they did a controlled burn and they asked that the intermediate ya school nearby be evacuated while they do that controlled burn but other than that that's the only thing or concern issued one gentleman cannot return to his home, the blast burned his windows and doors off, he t me he's had concerns about possible chemical contamination but he never thought there elos said he never really pursued those concerns but he did have them uaz: ammonium nrate is a commonly used fertilizer. is this an agricultural area of texas? is west a logical place to have a plant of this kind? >> yes, indeed, it is. and the plant has services all of the farmers and ranchers in this central texas area around west and on
something. about being aware of your environment. if it looks unusual. tell something abit. a -- about it. >> best advice. don't let them affect your life. go back and live your life. >> live your life. when you compromise how you live that gives them a victory. as painful as it is to day. you can't let them succeed by us changing the norm and how we live. can't let them win. no victories. >> i think the last point is so important. you can't let them win. can't say i will not go to the ball game because of what if? that's what they want. >> that's what they want. they want you to stay home and watch this coverage and be too scared to do anything. you have to go out and live your life. important clues, for as chaotic as that look. there are important clues of behind the -- >> the injured. if anybody has hand injuries. some one could be using bomb make mag terl and residue on their hants. >> this shrapnel and things that could have come from the device itself. >> that's right. and pierre thomas is reporting what they want to see is how was it detonated, remotely detona detonated, with a cel
wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] i loi ve these shoes. but buwhen they start hurting, i haveha to take them off. until tii found dr. scholl's for her. they sup sport and cushion my feet all day.y. this is ihappiness - happy feet. so, i', ve got energy and style all day. dr. sc. holl's for her . for foheels and flats. i'm i'a believe. welcome back the time is 6:56 a.m.. we're working on a hot spot that is still o box 30 to 40 minutes away from clearing. this has backed up 580 westbound for miles. we're looking at an hour or an 45 minute drive time. if this is from alta mount pass way to the 680 interchange. avoid this area and we will be right back with more of our live coverage. >> there is an interface service going on for the prayers of the victims of the marathon bombings. will be right back.
that only becomes more true in these environments. think about, this isn't islamabad coming online. think about what that does for education, for health. think about 5 billion new witnesses that can document atrocities that are being committed. of course there are challenges but there is a lot of good news ahead of us. >> everybody's empowered. you do a google search when you go to a doctor and instead of sitting there where the doctor is playing god -- >> has all the info -- >> you have as much info as you want going in there and a lot of doctors hate that. you can say wait a second, isn't there a possibility if you do that, this is -- we are empowered in every way from powered by a car and how we're taken care of and also democratically. i had had a political science professor who told me back in the '80s the soviets were mar for worried about a xerox machine than a cruise missile in west germany and she was right. >> the empowerment of information of people is really the way to solve almost every problem. when we went to north korea our idea was that if we could just get a little bit o
there is almost a divorce on how earnings and economies grow. connell: how does that environment sustain itself? >> is it sustainable in the long run, no. that means over a ten year cycle. i am focused over the next year or two years. earnings can continue to grow because we see 20% of s&p 500 companies hoarding. only 45% have beat revenues. i think that we could be in a period of time where we have a divergence in the markets between those that are doing really well and those that are not doing really well at all. you could get a lot of disparities. connell: brian jacobson, wells fargo, thank you very much. appreciate it. >> thank you. dagen: rilling knowing about it through minor. connell: at&t versus google. we will tell you why. we will keep an eye on the market. a big day today. oil is down. we will be back with much more on market now. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] help brazil reduce its ovell reliance on foreign imports with the launch of the country's largest petrochemical operation. ♪ when emerson takes up the challenge, "it's never been done before" simply bemes consider it solved.
. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations' with kroll and humane degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. law and international treaty obligations this conclusion is and based upon our own personal impressions, but rather grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes the torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees and many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constituting torture. but you look at the united states state department and its annual country reports
whether these were small bits of metal placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> reporter: shrapnel is just one of the clues investigators will be looking at. >> there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments within the victims. fragments in the sidewalk. what they're going to be able to do is probably reconstruct the timer device, what was used, they're going to look at the components of the bomb, able to tell them is this just somebody that put this together over the internet or is this a bomb maker? >> reporter: hundreds of state and federal investigators have descended on boston to try to find out who could have built the bombs and set them off. >> there are federal, state and local law enforcement all on scene and coordinating very close ly. the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. >> reporter: this type of attack has long been law enforcement's worst fear, a soft target where suspects can easily blend in and inflict mass casualties. the boston marathon is a heavily policed event. more than 500 national guard troops were on s
may also be a constraining factor. living in a bad home environment can be a big distraction. budget cuts is probably the worst problem of all. >> scheduled cuts that would take place unless congress acts would mean 8.2% cuts. >> cut. >> yes, cut. and these aren't just dollar signs in percent. they are children's futures. >> programs are designed to pick up the slack for kids whose needs aren't being met. all of those programs are designed to deliver needs of children not being met by the larger system. to cut seven point eight percent would have an incredible impact on students across america. >> before we fix the educational system, we need to find out what meets [indiscernible] >> we do have room for improvement. one of the areas that we are weak in is allowing students the opportunity to be creative in their learning and for us to decided relevance for students. with the advent of technologies, students don't teachers foreed information. they can go to the internet and get answers. but what they do need teachers for his what information is relevant? what information is accurate?
the internet, either at home or at the office or in the retail environment. so we're orienting everything we're doing at ebay, ebay, inc., to help consumers have a seamless shopping experience. >> john, last question i have, if there's one danger that i see particularly for paypal, it is scrappy competitors coming up, what you talked about last time you and i talked, braintree, et cetera, that have gotten some of the hot mobile retail start-ups under their wing. what's the major ting that ebay has to do to get the next fab, the next uber, for instance, under the paypal wing? >> well, there's going to be a lot of innovation in mobile payments and in this whole space because there's so much change. weened that. we actually respect and like that. we made several acquisitions. but we're innovating aggressively as well. we just launched our new mobile software library at south by southwest and actually companies like uber, companies like fab are using paypal and integrating paypal because paypal brings 120 million active consumers. paypal brings a network of capability that is strong. and so ther
of that traffic. .t causes obviously delays it has an adverse impact on the environment as well. is to expand the american plaza, but also pursue span.bridges fan -- new yorket in buffalo, we southern ontario are -- need capacity. w want emphasize that we are trying to remove barriers to access, both physical and in tolls. when you look at the situation with the peace bridge, a lot of tolls are being used to support expansion of the plaza to promote traffic between the united states and canada. this is something that would be of concern. my sense is that it would be a new agency imposed toll compared to the ones that are already in place. help iniate all of your helping us address the issues and the peace bridge connecting buffalo and southern ontario in particular. i yield that. >> thank you. i turned to the gentleman from utah. thank youecretary, for your services. this is probably a long hearing. you do not know the line of questioning, so it requires you to be an expert on everything. things i would like to ask you quickly if i could. >> sure. >> as a former air force pilot, uncomfortabl
to bring a little kin to the environment. here's some of what you said. r.d. copeland tweeted us, i build raw bale and ear plasr homes. can you explain what that means? >> he's got two brothers. >> i was thinking the same thing. >> we applaud him for what he's doing. >> i bet it smells goodtoo. >> another one. lindsay says her forite way to save the planet,sing cloth apers an wipes. >> i heard about that when i had my daughter. >> and then what happened? >> i think i tried it for, like, two days. >> you have to watch them. i thought the smell, and the sink is full of you know what. >> why do you hate the environment? >> willie! >> giada knows being green is a ar round deal. she's been working with ks in an elementary school in l.a. to plant a gardennd grow their own food. >> that's terrific. >> how did this come about? >> what i did in partnership with my agency is that we adopted the school i compton, californ. it's foster elementa, and there's a lot of actual kids who are foster kids in the school. what i really wanted to do tru was just allow them to have a pleasant, fun, educational e
as the competitive environment, do any of these other competitive services end up adding up to anything? i think so far the answer is clearly no. we're not seeing much from amazon prime or hulu or some of the other services to really grab share from netflix. >> yeah? all right. we will leave it there. thanks, everybody. appreciate your time tonight. see you soon. >> thank you. >> thanks. >> thank you so much. >>> shares of johnson & johnson meanwhile hitting an all-time high today. ceo alex gorsky is up next in an interview you'll only see here. the company's first quarter sales were $17.5 billion. we'll find out what he's got planned for the second quarter right after this break. stay with us. >>> >>> welcome back. johnson & johnson shares at an all-time high. 84.83 tl$84.83 a share. the company enjoyed a major boost after the potential type 2 diabetes drug was granted fda approval. let's check in on j & j. has the brand fully recovered from product recalls? ceo alex gorsky. >> great to see you almost a year later. >> a year later. when you first started, we talked a bit. let me go back to when we
on the environment and wildlife. let's look at where the ban applies. these include grocery stores, convenience stores, pharmacies as well as other shops. the ban does not include restaurants food takeouts or bags used for produce, meat, bulk foods d prescription meds. we want to make note, if you don't have that reusable bag handy starting today here in those san mateo county cities, you will have to pay 10 cents for a paper bag and that fee is going up in 2015. it will go up to 25 cents per paper bag. so it's a good investment to make right now. live in menlo park, cate caugiran, kpix 5. >> by the end of the year, at least 17 cities in san mateo county will have implemented that plastic bag ban. >>> new this morning, it turns out a new waterfront development deal in oakland requires a substantial down payment from taxpayers. our own phil matier reports that to help swing the deal with chinese backing, oakland has agreed to spend about $25 million in unused redevelopment money. that money would be used to buy two parcels of land from the signature development group. >>> later today oakland sch
environment and have been a part since iceland was -- [inaudible] >> taking step back and looking for a broadly two things i've been talking about climate change and fishing. has global environmental change been benefit to iceland's fishery or a detriment? >> well, it's very difficult to an that question, indeed it's one of the big issues -- a number of decades because it has tradition nayly been the key part of the export driven fishing circle. of course the species as well. some people are arguing cue to the -- [inaudible] so one of the reasons why there is a need for more active arctic corporation is in fact to study what is happen together fishery in the ocean of the world including the arctic and the ice melt. and i found it interesting when i invited them to iceland a few years ago, he is, as you might know, a special envoy of the president of france on arctic and polar issues. his argument was that the first dispute that would unearth nationings to a new situation in the arctic would be dispute over fisheries. that the meting of the arctic sea ice and the transmore fashion
that will come with this legislation. retailers have been operating in an environment where they have not been required to collect and remitt sales taxes for states where they do not have a physical presence. this legislation would change that almost in an instant. before we enact a new sales tax system we need to take into accounts the costs that will impose on businesses of all sizes and the difficulties those -- these companies will face as they adapt to the new regime. for example, there is the issue of vendor compensation. the streamlined sales and use tax agreement currently includes a provision giving states the opportunity to voluntarily compensate remote sellers -- quote -- "as a measure of good faith"-- unquote for registering to voluntarily collect and remit sales taxes into states where the seller has no physical presence. this is included in the agreement because under current law remote sellers are generally not required to collect and remit the sales tax and they incur a cost when doing so. the marketplace fairness act does not include any provision for compensation of remote se
environment even more. i think you have a great, virtuous cycle that's kicking in. >> that cuts to the fundamental question about netflix whether it's growing fast enough to pay for the international expansion and to pay for the content bills that it's rack up. >> if you look in detail at these figures who which you have to still, the loss overseas is $77 million and the negative free cash flow is 42 million, tony. >> there are a couple of things that have gone on in this quarter. one, we do see these improvements in the use of accounts payable which in the cash flow and the u.s. streaming business scale better which should provide more cash flow and the dvd business is not declining as fast and these guys are managing the business pretty well. if i can on the international, it's down, but not down as much assy we expected and the way to think about that is maybe these international markets are getting to profitability sooner than expected and it may not be as big of a drag as people thought going in. they're focusing on traditional valuation in the near-term. i think what the s
easy. it is challenging in this fiscal environment. administrations 39 budget -- $39 million budget request. consistent with what congress appropriated in 2013 for the department before sequestration cuts were applied. the level of funding in this budget is lower than what congress appropriated in 2009. stepping back and thinking of the challenges that our country and this department has faced since 2009, times square bombing, hurricane sandy, the ever-changing and growing cyber threat, and of the boston attack, it is easy to become concerned with this budget request. we are facing extremely difficult budgetary times. sacrifices must be made. they may not receive all of the funding. and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required during this deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. he is identified $1.3 billion in savings this year and more than $4 billion since 2009. he continues to move from a risk-based approach and it effort to save more money. i'm happy to see this budget proposes a much-needed increase for cybersecurity,
political environments. another approach, one that we favor, is to lay out a better and clearer conservative vision of american society. the role of government, unlimited opportunity, of political self-government. rather than new principles, what we need are better arguments. and when you take those arguments -- we need to take those arguments to the american people. it is in that spirit that we welcome today's speaker to heritageouat mike lee is in th third year of his first term. that means more terms to follow. the first -- the third year of his first term as united states senator from the state of utah. his background is in the law and, actually, he began his background in law at his family's kitchen table. his father, rex lee, was a law school dean, assistant u.s. attorney general and solicitor general for ronald reagan. senator lee is a graduate of brigham young university and byu law school, was a law clerk for judge dean benson of the u.s. district court of the district of utah and then judge sam alito's clerk when he was at the u.s. court of appeals for the 3rd circuit. he served as
of the slow to modest growth environment. interest rates we think will stay pretty low. that overall is a reasonably attractive back drop for companies to deliver okay earnings growth. and so we can take earnings disappointments as long as it's minor. but as you say, it is a gdp and an earnings cliff, then we return to late '07/'08 type markets. we don't think it's going to happen, though. >> jonathan, it's ross here. what would you describe as okay earnings growth? >> well, i mean, okay in the context of the last six to nine months has been earnings estimates coming down week after week after week after week. the aggregate impact of that, though, is that european earnings growth expectations for 2012, remember those numbers are not finalized until we see the full years coming in the first part of this year. analyst expectations started last year around plus 10% and then our minus 3%. that's quite a big shift down when you put that into context of what we saw in 2008 where the earnings estimates went from plus 20 to minus 50%. so we've really seen in the context of previously earning
but not faulty aggression. he has to be able to work in different environments and have the drive. >> they look like german shepherds but they're not, correct? >> correct. this is a belgian. they're very similar. dutch shepherd german shepherd and this one. >> i remember the raids carried out on osama bin laden's compound that we learned about a mall inroy. his name was cairo, is that correct? >> that's correct. >> that's the first time i got the sense that wow, these are dogs with elite units. >> absolutely it's something that has. been -- >> what do they do? why is it so critical to have a dog? >> the primary thing for them is bomb detection. to have the ability for a dog to be able to move out in front is priceless. >> and i kept -- when did this start happening? did somebody say let's bring a dog and somebody said that's not a good idea or did somebody say, that is a good idea? >> dogs have been used since man existed but special operations started using them in vietnam and then after that the programs were largely disbanded and after 9/11 it was decided s
this is not an environment in which to address this. there are serious allegations of what they knew and did not know, and we'll have the benefit of hindsight. we are all monday morning quarterbacks on this, but because of his and issue intricately woven into legislation, we ought to let the dust settle, the emotions calm down before we address it. ashley: when you look at the root they took, everything was done legally. they went through the process, the younger brother became a citizen on 9/11 last year, the older brother held a green card, they filled out all the forms. what did the fbi now reportedly, allegedly i should say, knew they were tipped off the older brother, there was concerned about him. from an immigration point of view, some say they got through the cracks. tracy: fbi does not monitor immigrants. the fbi would only get involved with immigrant if there is credible allegation of criminal activity. it did not rise to the level of prosecution of credibility. they can only go forward with and do something with evidence when there is enough evidence to move forward with it did not exist at the ti
committee that it is an rook anymore-rich environment and mr. speaker, i'm an acronym challenged individual, so i'll be talking about the network and information technology research and development program. in the future i'll call it the program. it's the federal government's main research and development effort in unclassified networking, computing, software cybersecurity, and related information technology. research conducted under this program has led to scientific growth and innovation in several areas, including technologies in science, engineering, and medicine, computer-based education and training, and near real time weather forecasts which is really important in my state of wyoming. currently 15 federal agencies are contributing members to the program and even more participate. so h.r. 967, the bill in front of us, does two things. it updates the high performance computing act of 1991, and it re-authorizes the program to advance our nation's networking and information technology research and development. it's the digital age, mr. speaker. advances in networking and information tech
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
an environment where cyberthreat information is shared in real time between all designate the federal cyberoperations centers to provide actionable information about all known cyberthreats. page 5, strike line 6 and all that follows through page 6, line 7. page 7, beginning on line 17, strike by the department or agency of the federal government receiving such cyberthreat information. page 13, strike line 13 and all that follows through page 15, line 23. page 17, strike line 15 and all that follows through page 19, line 19. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. woodall: mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time and i move the previous question on the amendment and on the resolution. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the previous question is ordered on the amendment and on the resolution. the question is on adoption of the amendment. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the amendment is adopted. the question is on adoption of the resolution, as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
, will probably be here working well past the year 2050 and probably, in today's environment, past the year 2060. our current retirement model is designed to give an employee a defined pension after a long career and it's a model that made a lot of sense in the 19 40's and 1950's but is not going to be appropriate for the 20 40's and the 20 50's. our world is becoming far so dynamic to make promises about pensions 40 and 50 years down the road. the benefit of a defined contribution system is that it gives employees options to consider. if job changes are possible, why hold people to benefits that they may not be able to use for 50 years? e're currently on a trajectory to hit about 400,000 career employees by the year 2017 and that's with all the changes we propose, the six to five day and the network changes as we shrink down. and after we reach that number, it's going to give us a pretty lean work force. we have a pretty lean work force right now from the standpoint of the network and the six-day delivery. but after that we will start hiring people. we estimate between 2017 and 2027, depending
the policy environment the so conducive to dealing with the key issues between the u.s. and mexico. is hot andtion bill heavy, front and center. ginsburg indid espagnole. shows, toe sunday talk about immigration. the gang of eight is hard at work on that. guns, u.s.-mexico relations. i think the guns may come out not quite as favorable to mexico's longstanding positions as the immigration debate might. i would take a 14 two. we will be in good shape. the third is trade. states, nowunited japan, canada, are linked in the trans-pacific partnership talks. talks with many of our key trading allies across the pacific. many of us view it as a chance. into thebring nafta 21st century. much on thee very u.s. agenda. it shows great forward progress. welcome all of you to what promises to be a truly fascinating session. the second reason this will be terrific is because of our panelists. i will say little bit more about the ambassador of mexico. meissner, who i served with in the clinton administration. she is one of our great experts. ted. , weseries of speakers today will have first ambassador med
. not clear if they're from the bomb itself or from -- from the environment around the bomb. the operations that we have performed are identical to the kind of work we would do in the army at a surgical team or combat support hospital. >> dr. king performed more than five surgeries on victims yesterday alone. >>> the thousands of runners still on the boston marathon's course when the bombs went off crossed something of a finish line yesterday in downtown boston. they were able to reclaim their belongings from marathon volunteers and given a medal for participating in the race. everyone had them. it had a unique story about this experience. >> of course, at first shock. you know not that i didn't believe my sister. nobody around me really seemed to know anything. nothing was out of the usual. runners kept going. but i decided to leave the route. and even running through the streets. >> her sister was across the street from where the bombs went off. she said the second blast rattled her teeth. she was hit by small pieces of shrapnel but unhurt. >> going back to those medals, really, that's wh
environment. the ultimate goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share is much of the operatedhow the pumps and how they were made. we know that the one in front of us up until almost the last moment was working hard to try to keep the ship from sinking. unfortunately, when the water pushes out the oilers -- ump stoppede p moving. >> i think of the crew of the monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve the union and how ironic is that today, 151 years later, they are still serving the nation but in a very different way and in ways they could never imagine, for helping us understand marine conservation and about our past and helping us move forward and learn from the lessons of the past. to, looking at the history and literary life of virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. texaswe're back with republican louie gohmert, a member of the judiciary committee. thanks for being here. guest: n
to make sure it fosters an environment where we can have small, medium and large banks, where we can have community banks that thrive, regional banks that tlooip thrive and large global banks. incidentally, andrew, if you look at the largest 50 banks, only about a half dozen are u.s. banks and incidentally, of the top 20 or 25 banks, our largest is number ten. so in terms of the size of our banks vis-a-vis our overall economy, much smaller than our international fears. >> but what about the idea that it's not just the banks. it's the financial companies, the insurance companies -- >> in addition to banks, we do have insurance companies in the financial services forum. >> there have been a lot of questions raised about all the regulations that were dropped on the banks when some of these other companies, like aig, for example, they were a huge problem and they're not going to be regulated in quite the same way. there's talk about cracking down on the insurer, as well. >> in the case of the nonbank, the group that was created under dodd-frank, the fsoc, is looking to designate a number of t
is deeply troubling in an increasingly restrictive environment of civil liberties. this includes the measures with respect to registration as foreign agents and also restrictions on press and internet freedom. we made clear with human dialogue but we remain committed to open dialogue with civil seent supporting their efforts. >> i do a follow-up on that? >> sure. >> in the past -- i think the u.s. government has talked a lot about their concern of human rights abuse in chechnya. i'm wondering if you think the events in boston are going to change the way the government would see human rights in chechnya? >> with respect to the ongoing investigation in boston, i have to reiterate the secretary's comment that it would be highly norptse to make comments at this time. i can tell you this has been part of our human rights reporting on russia since 1995. you will find quite a bit of information on this year's report and they note serious human rights abuses taking place and human rights violations committed by authorities and militants. >> this is going to be the last question. >> you m
chemicals that poison our water... and harm wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] >>> row, row, row your boat. a live look there at crew. wow, they are really going this morning. yeah, it's going to be a warm day. find some water if you can. >> five snow boarders have died in what officials are calling colorado's deadliest avalanche in five decades. it happened yesterday afternoon near loveland pass about 50 miles west of denver. authorities say six snowboarders were on the almost 12,000 foot high pass when all of a sudden the snow gave way. >> they triggered a slide. at least one of them was able to bail off to the side and partially buried, but he was able to get himself out and call for help. >> authorities say the avalanche was about 600 feet wide and 8 feet deep. right now, authorities say the avalanche danger in colorado is at a 30 year high due to a lack of snow. >>> some people in the town of west, texas, are being allowed back into their homes for the first time since that deadly fertilizer explosion. a curfew is sti
easily to $2 billion in savings. $4.5 billion and will be spent a day to operate in that environment. when in fact you cannot go on the street with the exception of the package delivery, which will be done with dynamic routing, with a lower-cost employee, whether in the rural craft or city craft and allow us to provide that service at a lower acroscost. that is all money that can come out of the system. if calculated in what we think is the revenue loss, and we have talked to customers to validate that. we are terms of that. that we clear something up. people say it is only $2 billion out of $20 billion. if we had it this year we would break even. this year we will lose $1.7 billion on the operating line. as revenue,-costs, with the exception of a worker's comp costs and pre funding. we would make money if we made the six to five move at the beginning of this year. what happens with a $20 billion of that gap exists when you do nothing over a five-year period, and with inflation that continues to grow. when people say it is only 10% of the cost differential, it is not, it would make u
't replace the wild west environment with a legal situation. >> let me ask another question. techis that the highest end. i'm thinking of a rhode island business that has a high technical level of accomplishment. they don't have a colossal hr department. they work in a particular niche, when they can identify the person they need as the person they need, there may be the person with a skill set like that anywhere to be found. if you need a specific profile in dover, does this give you the capability to reach outnd recrthat person? the concern i ve heard from these businesses ieven iyou have heard from this person and start recruiting them, it creates so much uncertainty and delay and havoc that if they have an international capability, they will go wherever -- to germany, india or china. are you comfortable we can compete with those kind of people where there is a specific person you are looking for? >> i think the bill seeks a number of important steps. is of the points you hit on just by going to brown, the ph going to a hospital. help, ashe numbers long as we avoidniend consequen
into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, if stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if it's from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life afraid. like oh my god, something bad's around the corner. living your life that way -- >> most of the time it isn't.
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)